Category Archives: oathkeepers

Raising your own meat – Oathkeepers Preparedness Class,

I love that my children can stand up in front of a group and share everything that has to with their homestead animals and the meat that comes along with it. Shelby and Elwyn had a GREAT presentation for the Oathkeepers. 
by Shelby Fullmer – August 12, 2017

Rabbits

Food – Alfalfa pellets, basic greens like kale, spinach, chard, leaf lettuce (NOT iceberg, cabbage or broccoli), alfalfa, timothy, and bermuda hays, carrots, even small quantities of raspberries, tomatoes and strawberries.  

Shelter – Rabbit hutches or colony living with buried wire with shade/cover to protect from weather.

 

Gestation period – 28 days – up to 14 babies

Male rabbits go sterile in severe heat and all rabbits need a cooling system in Arizona in the summer time. Frozen water bottles, fans, misting systems, in a cooler shelter, etc. are all good ways to keep your rabbits cool.

Uses of Rabbits – Meat, bones for broth, leather, fur, manure

A few of the meat breeds of rabbits for meat, Rex, New Zealand, Californians, American Chinchilla, Silver Foxes, Flemish Giants

Website with more information on breeds – http://theselfsufficientliving.com/best-meat-rabbit-breeds/

 

Chickens

Dual Purpose Chickens are the best egg laying hens combined with the best meat chickens. The truth of the matter is that there are plenty of chicken breeds that are good for both purposes.  Includes Rhone Island Reds, wynnedottes, barred rocks, orphingtons, Jersey Giants – all full sized chickens. For smaller meat and egg production Bantams or (mini chickens) lay smaller eggs and are about half the meat size of a regular chicken.  

Food – Layer, seed, oyster shells/ground egg shells for extra calcium, bugs, produce/greens, kitchen scraps (no meat)

Shelter – Coop to protect, layer boxes with hay, ground shavings/hay

Incubation times – Bantam 19-21 days, Full sized chickens – 20-22 days

Uses of chickens – Meat, bones for broth, feathers, fertilizer, insect control, garden prepping.

Website with more information on breedshttps://www.backyardchickencoops.com.au/dual-purpose-chicken-breeds

Waterfowl

Birds including ducks and geese

Heavy and medium weight ducks typically are raised for meat production. The main breeds are the Pekin and the Muscovy. Around 90 percent of the duck meat produced in the United States is from the Pekin. Commercial producers are able to obtain a duck weighing 7 to 8 pounds in seven weeks.

Food – Layer chow, oyster shells/ground egg shells for extra calcium, bugs, produce/greens.  

Shelter – Coop to protect, layer boxes with hay, ground shavings/hay, swimming pool/pond

Incubation times – 28 days

Uses of waterfowl – Meat, bones for broth/soup, feathers, fertilizer.

More information on raising waterfowl – http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/raising-ducks-geese/ducks-and-geese-zm0z14fmzchr

Quail

Fast growing animals for meat and eggs. In 8 weeks they are full grown and laying eggs between 8-10 weeks old.

Food – game bird chow, oyster shells/ground egg shells for extra calcium, bugs like mealworms, produce/greens, excess eggs – Quail need at least a 25% protein to lay.  

Shelter – Smaller rabbit hutches work great for quail.  Or larger enclosed coops

Incubation times – 16-17 days

Uses of quail – Meat (mainly breast meat), bones for broth/soup, feathers, fertilizer.

Information on Coturnix quail – https://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/quail/

 

Game Birds – Chukars (Partridges) and Pheasants

Food – gamebird feed and cracked corn in the winter for all your birds. You can also give them treats like fruit, veggies, mealworms, peanuts, and wild bird seed.

Shelter – Large enclosed pens with coop.

Incubation times – Chukar – 23 days, ring necked pheasants – 24-25

Uses – Meat, bones for broth/soup, feathers, fertilizer.

More information on Game Birds – https://wgfd.wyo.gov/WGFD/media/content/PDF/Habitat/Extension%20Bulletins/B33-Raising-Pheasants-or-Other-Game-Birds.pdf

Oathkeepers – Back to basics in the kitchen

Making life simpler

Kitchen tips and tricks

 

Can you imagine living in a world with no or limited power? I can see a future with no power or a limited time/amount of power that each family can use. What are some of the tools that you have in your home that you would need to have that are non-electric that would make your life easier?  We have talked in the past about solar ovens which is a GREAT appliance that is power free to cook your meal.

For our family the essentials for our kitchen are the following:

 

  • Cream Separator
  • Meat Grinder
  • Wheat Grinder
  • Butter Churn
  • Solar Oven
  • Sun Tea pot
  • Sieve or food mill
  • Pasta Roller
  • Cast Iron Kettle
  • Any Cast iron pots including a Dutch oven that can be used over a fire pit.­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
  • ________________________
  • ________________________

 

Manual Cream Separator

Cream Separator does exactly that… it separates your whole milk into cream and skimmed milk.   The skimmed milk can be drank or made into cheese, added to meals, etc. The cream can then be used to make butter, sour cream or added into your coffee.

A cream separator works via centrifugal force. The machine spins raw milk in a tub or basin. During this process, the lighter butterfat globules are flung to the outside of the container, where they can be siphoned off. The machine separates the cream much faster than the gravity method, and also separates more of the cream from the milk.

 

Hand Crank Meat Grinder

Grinding cuts of meat is easy and is healthier because you can choose your own cuts of meat to go through the machine and not worry about additives into your ground meats.

Attach the grinder to the side of a counter or table. Add specific blades into the machine. Add cuts of meat into the “bowl” and turn the crank. The meat will come out the front and fall into a bowl (that you put in front)

Hand Crank Wheat Grinder

This looks very similar to a meat grinder, only has much smaller blades for the grinding to make wheat seeds into a powder to be used in breads and other dishes.

 

Hand Crank Butter Churn

The agitation of the cream, caused by the mechanical motion of the device, disrupts the milk fat. The membranes that surround the fats are broken down, subsequently forming clumps known as butter grains. These butter grains, during the process of churning, fuse with each other and form larger fat globules. Air bubbles are introduced into these fat globules via the continued mechanical action of the churn. The butter grains become more dense as fat globules attach to them while the air is forced out of the mixture. This process creates a liquid known as buttermilk. With constant churning, the fat globules eventually form solid butter and separate from the buttermilk. The buttermilk is then drained off and the butter is squeezed to eliminate excess liquid and to form it into a solid mass.

(info from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butter_churn)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sieve or food mill

The convenience of a stand allows you to walk away and let gravity and the chinois do the work of straining. Use it for straining stock or in conjunction with the tapered wooden pestle as a food press to squeeze juice from raspberries or pulp from pumpkin while leaving undesirable fibers seeds and particles behind. The funnel shape traps the food so you can have at it with a pestle and it also directs the flow to bowl or pot. Note: Also called a a strainer or misspelled as “collander”
Read more at http://www.pickyourown.org/canningstrainers.htm#szMZY2IVLJuR0wmj.99

 

Pasta roller

Starting with one of the narrower, open sides of the folded dough, feed the pasta through the machine, again at the widest setting. Repeat the folding and rolling technique on the widest setting for a total of 5 times. And then adjust the width to the next setting and crank to flatten the pasta until the pasta is at the desired width.

 

 

 

Boule Bread

Boule, from the French for “ball”, is a traditional shape of French bread, resembling a squashed ball. It is a rustic loaf shape that can be made of any type of flour. A boulecan be leavened with commercial yeast, chemical leavening, or even wild yeast sourdough. 

Ingredients:

  • 6-1/2 cups of wheat – plus a small amount of flour to dust bread board) *if you grind your own wheat, you will need to add  a Tablespoon of wheat gluten to get a better rise.
  • 2 Tablespoon yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 3 cups warm water (not boiling, but warm to touch) plus 4 more cups of water for the bottom of the oven in a metal pan to “steam while cooking
  • 2 teaspoons salt (I only use pink Himalayan in my house)

Directions

  1. In a glass bowl, add water, yeast and sugar and let sit for 5 minutes or until bubbly. (OR instead, use 1 cup sour dough starter instead of the yeast mixture plus 1-1/2 cup of water – Sourdough starter recipe here)
  2. In a larger bowl, stir together wheat (and wheat gluten if you are adding extra) and salt.
  3. Slowly stir in yeast mixture(or sour dough starter plus water) into flour with wooden spoon.
  4. Blend well until dough forms.
  5. Place dough ball in clean bowl.
  6. Cover with cloth and let rise on counter for 1 hour.
  7. Divide the dough in half and roll out to form either a boule shape (round) or a baguette  (long and skinny) and let rise again for 1 hour.
  8. Using your bread knife, make slices into the tops of the dough about 1/2 inch deep. (I have always done this… I think that it is just decorative.)

 

  • (OPTIONAL – you can sprinkle with cheese or garlic, fresh or dried herbs before baking… (I have 3 kids who LOVE cheese and fresh jalapenos or garlic saon their bread)
  • Place dough in oven and pour 4 cups of water in a metal pan in the bottom of heated oven… this gives a crunchy outside layer.
  • Bake at 450 degrees for 30 minutes.

 

 

Homemade Egg Noodles

  • 1 cup flour plus more for rolling out
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 2 large eggs

 

  1. Combine the flour and salt in a large shallow bowl. Make a well in the center and crack the eggs into it.
  2. Use a fork to beat the eggs and then gradually start incorporating the flour into the eggs (as you beat them, they will just gradually take up the flour). Keep stirring and pulling in more flour until solid dough forms. The dough will be sticky. Don’t worry, you’ll be working in more flour in a moment.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a well-floured surface. With well-floured hands, knead the dough, incorporating more flour as necessary to keep it from sticking to the work surface or your hands, until it is smooth and firm and no longer sticky. This takes 5 to 10 minutes for most people.
  4. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and chill it for at least 30 minutes and up to overnight.
  5. Divide the dough into two pieces and work with half the dough at a time. On a well-floured surface roll out the dough to the desired thickness (anywhere from 1/4 inch to paper thin). Be sure to rotate or otherwise move the dough between each pass of the rolling pin to keep the dough from sticking to the work surface. Sprinkle everything with flour as necessary to keep the dough from sticking.
  6. Use a sharp knife or pizza cutting wheel to cut the noodles. You can make then as narrow or wide as you like but cut them as evenly as possible to ensure uniform cooking time.
  7. Lay the noodles on a cooling or drying rack and let them sit until ready to cook. Repeat rolling and cutting with the remaining half of the dough.
  8. Boil the noodles in well-salted wateruntil tender to the bite. Drain and serve with butter or cheese, with stews, or in soups.

https://www.thespruce.com/homemade-egg-noodles-2215807

 

                                                                                                                                          

OathKeepers Preparedness 2/25/2017 – Meals in a Jar

If you choose to not purchase pre-made freeze dried meals for an emergency, and instead choose to purchase #10 cans of ingredients, you need to know “what to do” with those ingredients. When in an emergency situation, the last thing that you should be thinking about is what you want to make for dinner and having to put that dinner together while searching through ingredients.

Freeze dried and dehydrated foods do not take a lot of extra planning, however, they can for certain recipes depending on how long that you have to soak your ingredients. I personally soak my dehydrated potatoes overnight.

#10 cans and 50 pound bags of fruits, vegetables, meats and dairy are GREAT to have on hand. We divide 50 pound bags into half gallon jars for easier storage and add an oxygen absorber to the top (and the bottom) if they are going to be sealed and stored away.

11 Emergency Food Items That Can Last a Lifetime

http://readynutrition.com/resources/11-emergency-food-items-that-can-last-a-lifetime_20082013/

Did you know that with proper storage techniques, you can have a lifetime supply of certain foods?  Certain foods can stand the test of time, and continue being a lifeline to the families that stored it.  Knowing which foods last indefinitely and how to store them are you keys to success.

The best way to store food for the long term is by using a multi-barrier system.  This system protects the food from natural elements such as moisture and sunlight, as well as from insect infestations.

Typically, those who store bulk foods look for inexpensive items that have multi-purposes and will last long term.  Listed below are 11 food items that are not only multi-purpose preps, but they can last a lifetime!

  1. Honey

Honey never really goes bad.  In a tomb in Egypt 3,000 years ago, honey was found and was still edible.  If there are temperature fluctuations and sunlight, then the consistency and color can change.  Many honey harvesters say that when honey crystallizes, then it can be re-heated and used just like fresh honey.  Because of honey’s low water content, microorganisms do not like the environment.

Uses: curing, baking, medicinal, wine (mead)

  1. Salt

Although salt is prone to absorbing moisture, its shelf life is indefinite.  This indispensable mineral will be a valuable commodity in a long term disaster and will be a essential bartering item.

Uses: curing, preservative, cooking, cleaning, medicinal, tanning hides

  1. Sugar

Life would be so boring without sugar.  Much like salt, sugar is also prone to absorbing moisture, but this problem can be eradicated by adding some rice granules into the storage container.

Uses: sweetener for beverages, breads, cakes, preservative, curing, gardening, insecticide (equal parts of sugar and baking powder will kill cockroaches).

  1. Wheat

Wheat is a major part of the diet for over 1/3 of the world.  This popular staple supplies 20% of daily calories to a majority of the world population.  Besides being a high carbohydrate food, wheat contains valuable protein, minerals, and vita­mins. Wheat protein, when balanced by other foods that supply certain amino acids such as lysine, is an efficient source of protein.

Uses: baking, making alcohol, livestock feed, leavening agent

  1. Dried corn

Essentially, dried corn can be substituted for any recipe that calls for fresh corn.  Our ancestors began drying corn because of it’s short lived season.  To extend the shelf life of corn, it has to be preserved by drying it out so it can be used later in the year.

Uses: soups, cornmeal, livestock feed, hominy and grits, heating source (do a search for corn burning fireplaces).

  1. Baking soda

This multi-purpose prep is a must have for long term storage.

Uses: teeth cleaner, household cleaner, dish cleaner, laundry detergent booster, leavening agent for baked goods, tarnish remover

  1. Instant coffee, tea, and cocoa

Adding these to your long term storage will not only add a variety to just drinking water, but will also lift morale.  Instant coffee is high vacuum freeze dried.  So, as long as it is not introduced to moisture, then it will last.  Storage life for all teas and cocoas can be extended by using desiccant packets or oxygen absorbing packets, and by repackaging the items with a vacuum sealing.

Uses: beverages, flavor additions to baked goods

  1. Non-carbonated soft drinks

Although many of us prefer carbonated beverages, over time the sugars break down and the drink flavor is altered.  Non-carbonated beverages stand a longer test of time.  And, as long as the bottles are stored in optimum conditions, they will last.  Non-carbonated beverages include: vitamin water, Gatorade, juices, bottled water.

Uses: beverages, flavor additions to baked goods

  1. White rice

White rice is a major staple item that preppers like to put away because it’s a great source for calories, cheap and has a long shelf life.  If properly stored this popular food staple can last 30 years or more.

Uses: breakfast meal, addition to soups, side dishes, alternative to wheat flour

  1. Bouillon products

Because bouillon products contain large amounts of salt, the product is preserved.  However, over time, the taste of the bouillon could be altered.  If storing bouillon cubes, it would be best repackage them using a food sealer or sealed in mylar bags.

Uses: flavoring dishes

  1. Powdered milk

Powdered milk can last indefinitely, however, it is advised to prolong it’s shelf life by either repackaging it for longer term storage, or placing it in the freezer.  If the powdered milk developes an odor or has turned a yellowish tint, it’s time to discard.

Uses: beverage, dessert, ingredient for certain breads, addition to soup and baked goods.

 

Chicken Flavored Rice Mix
4 cups long grain rice
1/4 cup chicken flavored instant dry bouillon granules
1 tsp. garlic salt
1 tsp. dried tarragon leaves
1 tsp. dried thyme leaves
2 tsp. dried parsley leaves
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 Tbsp. dried chopped onion

Mix all ingredients keep in an airtight container –
To Use – Mix 1 1/3 cups chicken rice mix and 2 cups cold water and 2 Tbsp. butter, bring to a boil in a medium saucepan over high heat. Cover pan and reduce heat to low, cook for about 20 min, until all liquid is absorbed. Makes 4-6 servings

http://foodstorageresource.blogspot.com/2012/01/make-your-own-rice-mixes.html

 

Beef Broccoli Stir-Fry

In a one Quart Wide mouth canning jar layer

  • 1 Cup Thrive Beef Chucks
  • 1/3 Cup of beef Stir fry mix
  • 1 Cup Thrive Broccoli
  • 1/4 Cups Thrive FD Carrots
  • 2 Tablespoons Thrive FD onion
  • 1/2 Cup FD Bell Peppers

In a baggie place

1 cup Thrive instant Rice place on top of jar

Add oxygen absorber or vacuum seal the jar, date and label.

Beef Stir Fry Seasoning mix

1/4 cup beef bouillon

  • 3 Tablespoons corn starch
  • 2 Tablespoons sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons dry minced onion
  • 1 Tablespoon Dry soy sauce powder
  • 2 teaspoons dried parsley
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red peppers

 

To Make

  • Add 4 cups of water to a skillet . Take out the baggie of rice and set a side. add jar meal to the water and let set for 10 to 15 mins simmer on low for 20 to 25 mins. after starting the jar meal cook the rice in a separate pot… after the rice is done server jar meal over rice.

http://rainydayfoodstorage.blogspot.com

Creating your own firestarters – Oathkeepers Preparedness Class

Learning different techniques to get that heat and/or cooking first started can be a matter of life and death. Here are a few tricks for fire-starters to get you started on some survival knowledge. These work great too in your own fireplace, wood stove, manual pellet stoves or your outdoor fire pit. (We use a few of these at our house too!) Many are great to keep in your camping and 72 hour bags as well.

We also get a chance to show you a simple and effective room heater to use ONLY in an emergency (we have heated up our greenhouse in the dead of winter with it until we got a Chiminea to help with the colder norther Arizona winters.)

Having reliable DIY fire starters nearby will spare you from many headaches down the road.

 Posted by Ryan Lisson – January 9, 2015   

http://www.wideopenspaces.com/make-easy-diy-fire-starters-home-woods/

It doesn’t matter if you’re in the great outdoors, your fenced-in backyard, or sitting next to your cozy living room fireplace, a quality DIY fire starter is just nice to have. As a rule of thumb, you should know how to start a fire without one. (You do, don’t you?) If not, you should learn soon as it’s just ahead of tying knots when it comes to necessary outdoor skills.

But there are situations when you’re short on time, or the kindling is a little damp, or you just plain want an easy way out (no judgment here). Or perhaps you don’t get outdoors much and don’t want to embarrass yourself by committing all kinds of camping blunders.

Worry no more. These DIY fire starters are simple to construct, cheap to make, and will save you time and frustration in the long run. Plus, they make great gifts as well!

Materials

First, you’ll need to collect some materials. Luckily, nearly every item needed for these DIY fire starters is easily found within or around your home. Odd leftover bits of candle wax, crayon stubs, paraffin wax, shredded paper, toilet paper/paper towel tubes, dryer lint, paper/fiber egg cartons, small paper cups, sawdust, pine cones, and string are some solid choices, but feel free to experiment! You’ll need an old coffee can or glass jar to melt the waxes, and do so by placing in a pot of boiling water (double boiler system).

Pine Cones

Simply gather up as many open pine cones in your yard as you can and allow them to dry well. Tie a string around the middle and thread it up to the top. Melt paraffin wax with some chunks of old crayons or candles (for color) and dip the pine cone into the hot wax. Allow to dry on wax paper. When ready, simply light the string like a wick, and watch the pine cone go!

Woodchip Cups

If you do any woodwork or cut your own firewood, you’ll likely have large amounts of sawdust, shavings, or chips laying around. Gather some up and let it dry out well. Fill some paper cups (or muffin cups in a muffin tin) with the shavings almost to the top. Pour the wax over the mixture and let harden.

Shredded Paper

You can follow the same recipe as the wood chip fire starter above. Just gather up some shredded paper (most homes and offices have plenty of this available) and fill the muffin cups as before. Pour wax over it and let harden. Then light the shreds of paper or the muffin cup itself to start it.

Toilet Paper Tube

Obviously you could cut up a paper towel roll as well for this fire starter idea, but simply stuff dryer lint or other flammable materials into the tube. Make sure it’s full but not packed, as you need air space to let oxygen in. You can add wax or petroleum jelly as well, but it works quite well as is.

Cardboard Strips

We all have too much corrugated cardboard coming through our house. Instead of recycling or burning it, do both! Cut strips about two inches wide by three or four inches long. Dip them in melted wax, leaving a small portion undipped. The corrugation leaves channels for air flow, and these light very easily.

Other ideas?

Don’t limit yourself to just these examples. There are many other creative ways to make your own DIY fire starter. You could use birch bark, dried conifer twigs, cotton balls, etc. Or you could even combine some of these ideas together, such as putting a pinecone into an egg shell container, and covering with wax and sawdust.

As long as it lights easily and burns for a few minutes, you’ve succeeded.

The Uber Match- http://www.practicalprimitive.com/skillofthemonth/ubermatch.html  

(As featured in the September 2011 issue of Practically Seeking)

The ability to get a fire going can be the difference between life and death. That is why I always have multiple means of creating one at my disposal.

The Uber Match is simple to make, and when done correctly is reliable, along with being highly water and wind  resistant. Why you would NOT have a couple of these in ANY outdoor kit I cannot fathom!

Though traditionally made using strike anywhere matches (yes, you can still find them in this post 9-11 world) they can also be made using strike-on-the-box varieties — just make sure you have the box striker as well or you are screwed.
An Uber Match will burn for 5-7 minutes easily, produces a much larger flame than a standard match and gives off far more heat.

A major trick to making sure your Uber Matches will really work well is to allow a little bit of space between the matches and just below the match head.

Now onward with the process!

Step-by-step Instructions on How to Make an Uber Match:

  1. Take out 4 matches, preferably of the strike-anywhere variety. (These are the ones that have a white tip on the red match-head.)

 

  1. Completely unroll a regular cotton ball, and then split it in half, length-wise. (One cotton ball makes two Uber Matches.)

 

  1. Melt paraffin wax (our preferred wax for this and available at your grocery or hardware store) or any other type of wax (old candles, crayons, beeswax, etc) in a small container over low heat. An old tuna can works great for this and will sit easily on the stove burner.

 

  1. While your wax is melting, take one of your matches and, starting just below the tip (make sure you can see a short bit of the match stick) wrap around the stick one complete turn with the cotton. Take your second match place it up against the first, then wrap the cotton once completely around the two together.

  

  1. Add your third and then fourth matches in the same manner, wrapping the cotton around all three, then all four matches, creating a square, not a line. This way of wrapping creates necessary air space between the matches to allow for easy ignition. (Remember fire requires fuel, heat and oxygen to establish combustion.)

   

  1. After all 4 matches have been wrapped together continue to wrap the remaining cotton around all 4 sticks until you have completely covered the match sticks all the way down to the bottom. Strive to make the wrap nice and even all the way down, as if you were wrapping a mummy for Halloween.

  

  1. Roll the now completely wrapped matches tightly between your fingers to really squeeze down the cotton wrapping.

 

  1. Give the BASE of your Uber Match a quick dip in the melted wax and allow to cool and harden slightly. (For the sake of domestic relations, lay down a piece of aluminum foil for a cooling station — wax can be very difficult to remove from counters, stove tops and plates!)

  

  1. Once the base is cool enough to handle, give the top of your matches a quick dip in the wax far enough that the entire Uber Match is now completely coated in wax. Set it aside and allow to cool. When the wax is cool enough to handle but still warm enough to mold, use your fingers to press the wax-covered cotton into the matches and shape each Uber Match to a nice smooth cylinder.

  

  1. After the wax has hardened on all your Uber Matches, place several into an old pill bottle (along with the box striker if you have been forced to use strike-on-box types) and put this in with your camping gear/emergency kit/GO Bag. Allow the remaining wax to cool in the tuna can and it will be ready to melt again for your next set of matches!

  

  1. These Uber Matches will strike even when wet. And be careful, they have a much bigger flame than a regular match!

  

 

 

 

 

How Do I Make Vaseline Cotton Ball Fire Starters?

http://www.ramblinjim.com/articles/using-vaseline-cotton-balls-as-a-fire-starter/

To make your fire starters, you just need two ingredients — petroleum jelly and cotton balls. Any brand of petroleum jelly will work, just make sure it’s 100% pure petroleum jelly. You’ll need a lot of it, so get it in bulk. For the cotton balls, get jumbo-sized cotton balls and check the package to be sure they’re 100% cotton. Artificial fibers won’t take a spark.

Rubbing the Vaseline into a cotton ball is messy work. The fibers of the cotton ball tend to pull apart and the Vaseline gets everywhere. The cleanest, easiest method I’ve found is to put a scoop of Vaseline into a snack-sized Ziploc bag, toss some cotton balls in, zip it up, then knead the Vaseline into the cotton balls.

You want to get as much Vaseline in the cotton ball as you can without completely saturating the cotton ball. It’s very important to have some dry fibers available in the middle to take the flame, especially if you use a firesteel or magnesium rod.

 

How to Make Lint Fire Starters

https://www.thebalance.com/how-to-make-lint-fire-starters-1388857

 By Erin Huffstetler  Updated July 05, 2016

Forget about paying for fire starters. You can make all the fire starters you need for free.

Difficulty: Easy

Time Required: 15 minutes or less

What You Need

  • Dryer lint
  • Cardboard egg cartons
  • candle wax (old candles work great)

Here’s How

  1. Fill each cup of the egg carton with dryer lint.
  2. Melt the wax in a double boiler.
  3. Pour the wax over top of the lint.
  4. Allow the wax to cool and harden. Then, cut the egg carton up to create 12 fire starters.

To use: Simply place a fire starter in your fireplace (or firepit) with your kindling and light. The wax will keep the starter going long enough to ignite your kindling.

Tips

  1. Be sure to cover your work surface, before you start.
  2. You can use saw dust from non-pressure-treated wood in place of the dryer lint, or broken crayons in place of the candle wax. There’s plenty of room to improvise.
  3. Fire starters make great gifts. Make a bunch, and you’ll be all set for Christmas.

 

 

Tea Light Personal Space Heater

http://simplydixon.com/2014/01/06/tea-light-heater/

Jeremy January 6, 2014 do it yourselfhome

This may sound like one of those “free” energy things, and I’ll admit that I was a bit skeptical about this working until this morning. After spending a morning next to this thing, I can now say that this tea light candle heater actually works. You have to be near it to get warmer or have a small space to heat, but it works…really.

What is it?

Basically it is 4 tea light candles, placed in a foil lined bread dish, covered up with one terracotta pot and that covered up with a larger terracotta pot.

How well does it work?

I have a relatively large space in my completely unheated basement office, but if i put it next to where i’m sitting I can definitely feel the heat.

Why it works

The inner pot gets really warm, even hot to the touch, so I imagine that the two pot system helps keep some of the heat contained so it can slowly let it radiate from the pot instead of letting the candles heat dissipate quickly in the cold air. I’m sure there are many others who know a lot more about the inner workings of this type of a heating method.

How I made mine

  • 1 glass bread dish (metal would probably work better if we had one)
  • Line the dish with aluminum foil (I figure it would help reflect the heat back at the pots)
  • 4 tea light candles placed in the center of the dish (you can get100 of them from amazon for $8.95)
  • one smaller clay pot, set on the dish (must be large enough to rest on the top of the dish to create airflow for the candles)
  • a larger clay pot set on top of the whole thing but resting on the top of the bread dish.

 

 

Raising Chickens – Oathkeepers Preparedness Class – January 28, 2017

January is the planning month to get going on your homestead. Besides saving food for your monthly stash and getting ready for your spring gardening, you need to start thinking about other things that you could do. Poultry can provide eggs and meat for you and your family. Our family has chosen to raise a lot of different poultry types and breeds. We have included chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys, quail, and soon to have chukars and pheasants at our home.  We chose breeds of chickens that are both for meat and eggs. Many of our other birds, we breed for meat and incubate our own eggs from our own adult birds. Favorite chicken breeds in our house are Barred Rocks and Americaunas (Easter Eggers).

If the chickens are allowed to eat bugs, fresh greens, and scratch grains, the eggs will have a higher nutrient content. Researchers conclude that eggs from pasture raised chickens may contain:

 

  • 1⁄3 less cholesterol
    • 1⁄4 less saturated fat
    • 2⁄3 more vitamin A
    • 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids
    • 3 times more vitamin E
    • 7 times more beta carotene


Remember that home-grown eggs will have a darker yellow to an almost orange-gold yolk vs the store bought ones will have a lighter yellow yolk.

 

Shelf Life of Eggs

The eggs you buy at your local grocery store are usually, probably weeks old. Technically, eggs do indeed have a long lasting shelf life once refrigerated, however the older they are the flatter the white & yoke becomes.  If you are wondering about the shelf life of homegrown eggs in the refrigerator, it’s approximately 3 months. We do not wash out eggs and do leave them out on the counter for several week.

 

http://www.olsensgrain.com/articles/chicks-articles/spring-chick-arrivals-at-chino-valley-2017-01-4624

 

Top 7 Tips for First Time Chicken Owners   http://commonsensehome.com/best-chicken-tips/

  1. Start with chicks.I know it seems like it might be fun to incubate and hatch your first batch of chickens from eggs, but it’s much simpler to start with a healthy bunch of chicks and go from there. While hatching your own is definitely something you may wish to consider in the future, allow yourself to become accustomed to the inner workings of chicken health and behavior before taking on the sometimes frustrating world of egg incubation.

Most local feed stores receive chick orders in the spring, so watch store flyers carefully to determine when they’ll arrive in your area. If this isn’t an option where you live, you can also mail order chicks from places online like Murray McMurray Hatchery.

Another option is to purchase mature hens who are already laying for your first flock. While this works some of the time, you often end up with the “culls” from other people’s flocks, so be careful of what you are buying.

  1. Choose dual-purpose breeds.Chickens are usually categorized into two varieties: meat breeds and laying breeds. If you aren’t quite sure which route you wish to go, choose a breed that is known to lay a decent number of eggs, but also has adequate meat production in case you end up with extra rooster or a hen that doesn’t lay. Personally, my favorite breeds are Rhode Island Reds, New Hampshire Reds, Barred Rocks, and Araucanas. Dual purpose chickens also seem to be hardier and more self-sufficient than other more “specialized” breeds.
  2. You don’t have to go crazy with your coop. I’ve seen some wild chicken coops lately! Some of them are fancier than my actual house, and it’s hard to tell if they were intended for a human or a bird. If having a fancy coop is holding you back from getting a flock of your own- don’t let it. Chickens don’t require a 5-star resort to be happy. A few things chickens DO need however: protection from predators, a place to roost, nesting boxes (for layers), and a place to roam.

You can easily meet these needs by modifying an existing building (small barn, shed, or even a doghouse) or building a small chicken tractor. Check out my chicken board on Pinterest for ample chicken coop and tractor inspiration.

  1. Stay as natural as possible. As the interest in chicken keeping grows, so do the gimmicks. You can make your chicken adventure as simple or as complicated as you would like. A few ways I keep my chickens as natural as I can:
  • I free range my girls when at all possible, which cuts down on my feed bill and provides them with a diet more like nature intended. (Plus, they LOVE it! Just be cautious of potential predators.)
  • I avoid using chemicals or special “washes” to disinfect my coop, instead I use a natural, homemade solution.
  • I feed them crushed egg shells to help to supplement their calcium intake.
  • I give them many of my kitchen scraps which helps to provide them with extra nutrients and it keeps that much more waste from hitting my garbage can.
  • I don’t leave lights on them year around to force them into laying. Since chickens were designed to take a break from laying, I prefer to allow them to do so- which also helps to reduce the amount of electricity I use. (However, I DO provide heat lamps whenever our temperatures drop.)
  • I go homemade whenever possible. I’ve avoided purchasing the expensive chicken equipment at the feed store by creating my own feeders and chick waterers out of repurposed items. We also made our nesting boxes and roosts from scrap lumber. There are many ideas and plans available online, including this idea of turning 5 gallon buckets into nesting areas.

 

  1. Establish a routine. Some people seem to think of their chickens as dogs and spend countless hours doting on them. I personally don’t have that luxury, since I’m running an entire homestead, with many other animals. Since my chickens are actually one of the lower maintenance aspects of my homestead, it’s easy to “forget” about them sometimes… I’ve found that things run the smoothest when I establish a daily routine for filling feeders, waterers, freshening the bedding, and collecting eggs. That way, the poor girls don’t get pushed to the back burner. 
  2. Keep things clean.This goes along with the previous point of establishing a routine. Dirty nesting boxes equal dirty eggs which equals the dilemma of whether or not you should wash your eggs.

An ounce of prevention goes a long way- it only takes a minute or two to clean boxes and replace bedding if you do it each day. If you wait until the end of the week, you’ll have a much bigger task, plus lots of dirty eggs. The same goes for the floor of your coop- if you are using the deep litter method, take a minute or two to turn the bedding each time you are in the coop.

  1. Get a heated water bowl. Generally I’m the type of person who prefers the non-electric method of dealing with problems. However, when it comes to dealing with chicken water, a heated dog bowl has been invaluable! If you live in a cold climate like me, shallow chicken buckets or pans freeze quickly, and you’ll be outside every couple hours breaking ice and refilling. Save yourself some time and headache by splurging for a plug-in dog bowl. It’s a great investment and my girls definitely appreciate it. (During warm weather, on demand waterers, which basically work like drip pet waterers on a larger scale, may be easier to keep clean than standard waterers, but they are prone to freezing.)

As you can see, chickens can be as easy or as complicated as you choose to make them. If you have the time and energy, then by all means, build a Victorian-style coop and mix them up gourmet treats.  However, if you are a full-time homesteader like me, I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the benefits chickens will add your homestead, without a lot of extra work.


Typical Chicken Characteristics Beginners Look For

http://www.thehappychickencoop.com/best-beginner-chicken-breeds/

We’ve found that most of the time, when people email us asking what breed of chicken they should start with, they are all looking for the same thing.

Most beginners are looking for chickens which are easy to keep, lay lots of eggs, are docile and aren’t very noisy.

This is why we always recommend what’s known as dual purpose birds to begin with. Dual purpose birds are normally great egg layers and very calm- we will discuss specific breeds later on.

Some beginners email us and ask for rare breeds or breeds which produce a lot of meat. We don’t recommend either of these for beginners simply because they require much more time, and are harder to look after. We always recommend avoiding meat and exotic birds until you gain more experience.

Best Egg Laying Chicken Breeds

So if you are like us and want to start keeping chickens for eggs, which breed would we suggest?

Bear in mind that the suggestions below are ideal for people with little experience who are looking for backyard chickens, which are easy to manage, require small amounts of maintenance and most importantly… lay lots of eggs!

1. Rhode Island Red

Rhode Island Reds are synonymous with backyard chicken keeping and one of the most popular chicken breeds around (source). They are friendly, easy to keep and very tough.

Eggs: Should produce upwards of 250, medium-sized, brown eggs per year.

Character: They are very easy to keep, don’t require too much space and lay all year round.

  1. Hybrid

Hybrid breeds such as Golden Comets have been bred to consume small amounts of food and to lay as many eggs as possible. Whilst this is great for you, this can be detrimental to the hens health as their body never rests.

Eggs: Upwards of 280, medium-sized, brown eggs per year.

Character: Hybrids tend to make excellent layers, consumer less food, and aren’t very likely to become broody. They make a great choice, however make sure you source your hybrid from a sustainable breeder and ensure that it hasn’t been overbred.

3. Buff Orpington

Buff Orpington’s are one of the easiest and most popular egg laying chickens around. They originate from Kent, England and are renowned for their good looks and sturdiness.

Eggs: Should produce at least 180, medium-sized, light brown eggs per year.

Character: Orpington’s make great pets as they are extremely friendly and soft. However they do get broody during the summer months hence why their egg production is slightly lower than some of the other breeds mentioned here.

4. Plymouth Rock

The Plymouth Rock, also known as barred rocks, originates from the US and is one of the most popular dual purpose chickens.

Eggs: Should produce 200, medium sized, brown eggs per year- they also lay during the winter.

Character: They are a very active bird who performs best as free-range and would make a perfect backyard chicken. They are also extremely friendly with humans so great if you want to train them to eat from your hand!

5. Leghorn

The leghorn breed originates from Italy and was first introduced into the US during the 1800’s. They don’t get broody often and are an ideal pick for year round egg laying.

Eggs: Should produce upwards of 250, medium sized, white eggs per year.

Character: Leghorns will be happy in gardens as they are a very active chicken however they aren’t very tame so aren’t ideal for people with children wanting them as a pet.

With these suggestions made its important to remember you always get ‘bad-chickens’ and even the most docile breed can produce occasionally problematic birds.

All of these breeds above should be available from a local hatchery and we’d recommend at the start not to mix breeds within your flock.

Pick a breed and start off with them. This will help reduce pests and stop them attacking each other.

Remember the breed you purchase will require varying amounts of food in their diets, read what should I feed my chicken for more info.

 

 


Prescott Arizona Chicken Ordinance     Listed on www.backyardchickens.com

Are Chickens Allowed in this location Yes
Max Chickens Allowed None specified
Roosters Allowed No
Permit Required No
Coop Restrictions Chickens must be “physically secure.” No space requirements.
City/Organization Contact name Prescott City Clerk, 928-777-1272, http://www.cityofprescott.net/leadership/code/
Additional Information Ordinance 5-3-1 relates to the \”Regulation of Animals\” and contains all relevant rules regarding chickens within city limits.
Link for more Information http://www.cityofprescott.net/_d/cctitlev1210.pdf
Information Last Updated 2011-05-28 19:34:23

 

NOTE: This information was submitted by a member of our chicken forum. Please make sure to double check that this information is accurate before you proceed with raising chickens. You can read more info about checking local laws here..

 

 

How To Raise Quail For Beginners

Posted on November 22, 2016 by adminhttp://www.how-to-raise-livestock.com/2016/11/22/raise-quail-beginners/

Are you a livestock farmer who is looking at adding a new livestock on your farm? Or you are just looking for an easy to raise livestock? If so then look no further than raising Coturnix quails. They don’t require that much care and require less feed, but none-the-less produce quality healthy meat and eggs.

The growth of livestock farming in urban areas has seen a lot of farmers raising quails, although they can also be raised in rural areas. This bird was first domesticated in Asia and belongs in the family of birds such as partridges, chickens and pheasants which are called the Phasianidae.

Coturnix quail come in different varieties, which are gentle and can be raised in small areas. A lot of folks raise them for the production of eggs and meat, at six weeks they are considered fully grown and can start producing eggs.

The male quail unlike chicken roosters don’t make a lot of noise which make it neighbour friendly and a great choice for those who would like to raise them in urban areas. But before you do that you may want to enquiry with your authorities weather you are permitted to raise them in the area you live in and what sort of permit would you need if you want to raise them.

Some quail parents don’t like the idea of hatching the quail so it can be wise to have an incubator to hatch the eggs. It takes about 17 to 18 days for the thumb-sized chick to emerge from the egg shell.

When the chicks emerge from the eggs they can be sluggish at first, they can start running around at full speed and can begin eating fine crushed game bird plus drink some water. Since they can be very small at this time, to prevent them from drowning in the waterers, you can use some soda bottle caps as waterers. To make it safer you may place a marble at the center of the caps.

In their first few weeks of life, just like chickens you can provide some heat lamps to keep them warm. Young quails are very vulnerable to cold and can result to them dyeing in a short period of time. Quails grow very quickly weighing between 3-1/2 — 5-1/2 ounces and grow to be around 5 inches tall when they are adults. They can live for around 1.5 to 4 years.

Once quails become adults they require minimum care to maintain good health. As a farmer you should provide them with a well ventilated house, some high protein feed and access to fresh clean water.

A lot of folks who raise quails for the production of meat and eggs house them in welded wire cages. When using this housing method make it a point that the constructed floor has holes not larger than 1/4 inches so the birds feet don’t get trapped in the holes. Each cage should house one male per cage, reason being males turn to fight with each other, and in some cases can lead to death.

Female quails need about 14 hours of sunlight each day in order to produce eggs, fewer daylight will delay laying activities. So supplemental lighting has to be provided.

When it comes to waterers you can purchase them in most pet stores, but a lot of farmers also use rabbit water bottles. The reason why they prefer them is because they keep the birds from fouling in the water, causing you to refill with clean water every single day.

Quails are known to be gentle birds, but can be skittish. Don’t give them a chance to escape from their cage because they can be difficult to recapture, even if you can be using a net. They have small bodies that can fit in small holes and once they escape they will never return.

When raising quails for meat, there is no better breed in the Texas A&M if you leaving in the USA. Comparing to other Coturnix breeds, the Texas A&M weigh 10 to 13 ounces at the scale in only 7 weeks.

When raising quails for eggs, Coturnix quail eggs can lay around 200 to 300 eggs per single year, but you have to make sure they are well taken care of and provided with artificial lighting if needed. That’s the advantage of raising quails over chickens in your farm, it’s the length of time it takes to get some return of investment.

Chickens start to lay eggs when they are about 18 to 26 weeks old, a single female quail can deliver around 72 to 120 eggs at that given time.

Making the decision to raise quails, the next thing for you is to have a business strategy on how to maintain them for greater returns. This shouldn’t be a complicated plan. If your family is planning in eating the quail meat and eggs, then you don’t need that much planning. But you are planning on selling the meat or/and eggs then you have to take to account your local market.

 

There are lots of business opportunities when raising quails. Their eggs are very popular in Asia, with the growing population you may want to position yourself to supply the demand market. Even if you don’t target the Asian market, quail meat is also growing in popularity in the USA.

Quail is also a bird widely used for hunting purposes. Some hunters prefer to train their dogs using live quail. To get some leads you can look at some local hunting clubs, some hunting organizations even purchase live quails to stock their ranges for the loyal clientele.

Breeding quails is a very lucrative industry. A lot of farmers maybe searching to buy live birds, hatching eggs or even fully dressed birds. You can put up an ad on maybe Craigslist for local people who may be interested in buying your birds.

Quail meat is very good tasting and full of nutrients, once a person tastes it they will be wanting more. Their eggs taste good as well and when boiled can be used to make a healthy snack for children. To make sure they are well boiled you can cook them with a splash of white clear vinegar in the boiling water. And they also peel very quickly.

Quail eggs are also on high demand by caterers for use as eggs that are devilled since they make nice bite-sized snacks. You can also sell them to local stores as premium eggs.

Having a well planned business strategy when raising quails is the key to successful quail farming. These birds are easy to manage even when they are fully grown, but caution should be taken when raising quail chicks because they may drawn in normal waterers. To avoid this from happening you can use bottle caps and place a marble at the center of the cap.

With very little work upfront you can be on your way to raising healthy quail. Just make sure you are well prepared for this new business venture and you won’t go wrong.

 

Oathkeepers – January 14, 2017 – mealworms, Zone 7 planting

mealworms, Zone 7 planting

 

January 14, 2017 – OathKeepers Preparedness

A New Year, A New Start – On our homestead so far for 2017, we have had 9 baby goats born, added 400 quail eggs to the incubator, acquired 4 new New Zealand meat rabbits (1 buck and 3 does), we stocked up on a months’ worth of Quinoa, flax seeds, Himalayan salt and popping corn seeds. We have planted 60 6-pack planters full of medicinal herbs.
We are continuing our fodder for animal feed and also have meal worms growing for extra protein foods for our chickens.
What are some of the things that you can do to be better prepared for the new year?
1. __________________________________________________
2. __________________________________________________
3. __________________________________________________
4. __________________________________________________
5. __________________________________________________ .

Raising Your Own Mealworms – http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/30444/how-to-grow-your-own-mealworms-instructions

1. Find a clear plastic container with approximately six-inch high sides. It may be the size of one to three square feet. For ventilation, drill about forty 1/4 inch holes in the lid. If condensation occurs, drill even more holes, or cover the container with a screen.

2. Put about three inches of one part chick starter (or laying mash) and one part wheat bran (optional) in the container. Mix well and level it. This is food for your newly hatched mealworms.

3. Cut an apple in half. Turn the round side down and push it down into the feed until flush with the feed and bran mixture. This is to give them moisture. If the skin of the apple is removed, the moisture in it will get into your feed and will spoil it. For this reason, do not peel your apples. Check your cultures every week to make sure they aren’t out of apples.

4. Add thirty to forty mealworms per square foot of container. Get them from your friends, or you can find them in a farmer’s feed building, usually under his feed bags. They can also be bought. Add four layers of unprinted paper such as the regular brown grocery bags. Put paper on top of the feed mixture, apple halves, and mealworms. Mealworms love to hide between the layers of paper. I record the date I start each culture on the top layer of paper.

5. Store such a started culture at room temperature, or warmer. These mealworms will each turn into a pupa, then the pupa will turn into a beetle. These beetles will mate, then lay their eggs between the paper and feed. After this, the beetles die. This is their complete life cycle. Soon, you’ll see many tiny mealworms when you run your fingers through the top of the feed. They will produce up to 3,000 worms per square foot of container. This complete cycle will take only two to three months, if your culture is stored at, or slightly above, room temperature. Temperature plays a big role in the length of the beetle’s life cycle. I start a new culture every month. This strategy keeps me in plenty of worms.

6. Replace the apples whenever they are completely eaten or half spoiled. After the young mealworms are seen, keep two halves, rather than only one half apple, per square foot of container. Keeping plenty of moisture (apples) available keeps the worms growing faster. Potatoes also work, but apples work better because they supply more moisture for the worms.

7. Put fully grown worms into another well-vented container with only some feed and a bit of apple. Store these in a cool place, or even in the refrigerator. This delays them from turning into pupae for up to six months. Set container out to room temperature for one day every week to allow the worms to feed.

 

 

Zone 7 – Vegetable Planting Calendar Guide

Garden Zone Map

 
Zone 7 has medium length growing season. Most vegetable varieties will have no problem maturing before your first frost date. With a last frost date of April 15th and first frost date of November 15th. These dates will vary a week or two so it’s important to watch the weather before planting. Annual minimum temperature for zone 7 is 5ºF.
 
Zone 7 Hardiness Dates
Last Frost Date First Frost Date
April 15 November 15

Use your last and first frost dates to calculate your planting schedules.

Using the planting schedule below will help you get the most out of your garden. Starting seeds indoors before your last frost date will give you a jump start on the growing season. Knowing when to transplant seedlings outdoors will help to maximize your harvest. 
 
 

LDS January and February Meal Storage

You can download the entire LDS Preparedness book online at https://www.ldsavow.com/PrepManualGeneral.html

Monthly Food Storage Purchasing Calendar Compiled by Andrea Chapman If you are just starting out, this calendar can be used any year. Just start with the current month’s items. We have tried to keep the costs down to between $35 and $45 per week. This might seem rather costly, but if you want to build a good food storage in only one year, it will cost you more each week than if you spread out acquiring it over several years. Be certain to buy only items your family will use, and rotate and use the items in your storage throughout the year. Milk is an expensive item and prices keep soaring, so you might need to invest in a bit higher food storage bill to buy it right now. * The items in the first few months are basic essentials and are the most important to purchase and store. It is vital to get WATER – STORAGE . If you don’t have water, you will not be able to use many of the foods you have that are dehydrated or require water to cook. Many times in natural disasters, the electricity goes down and you will not be able to access your water. Sometimes the water is contaminated from flooding and cross-contamination from sewage. You will need water, at very least, you will need 3 days worth. ___________________________________________________________________
January
Week #1
1 case canned fruit
2 #10 cans instant potatoes
 
Week #2
3 #10 cans dry milk
 
Week #3
3 #10 cans dry milk
 
Week #4
9 pounds yeast
 
Week #5
Anything you have missed from above ___________________________________________________________________
 
February
 
Week #1
Water Storage Containers-buy either 55 gallon drums, 5 gallon water containers (available at all emergency preparedness stores and some super markets) and spigot, or start to save water in pop bottles and plastic juice containers. Also purchase 100 lbs. hard white wheat and three plastic storage buckets with tight fitting lids. Check out the local mills in your area for best prices.
 
Week #2
25 lbs of sugar or 20 lbs of honey
5 lbs salt per person bucket opener
 
Week #3
4 #10 cans shortening or 4 – 48 oz bottles oil
2 #10 cans of dry instant milk
 
Week #4
2 case canned beans (like refried pinto, black, kidney, white, pink etc.) or 25 lbs dry beans (preferable) and bucket to store them in.
50 lbs dried corn or popcorn (about $10.00 from a mill or food storage company) and a bucket to store it in. (Can be ground into cornmeal as well as for popcorn.) (All grains and beans can be put into #10 cans at the LDS cannery.) (If not, the buckets work well.)

Basic rules for home food storage

GREAT website full of information – www.pssurvival.com

Basic rules for home storage:

Rule 1: Store what you eat, and eat what you store. It would be too bad to have a supply of food you would only eat with the greatest reluctance. Also, you can spend a lot of money on a supply of food and other provisions now, but after 15 or 20 years it won’t be much good anymore. Which brings us to the second rule.

Rule #2: Rotate your food supply. Eat the old and replace with new food. It’s great on the pocket book. Large amounts can be purchased when they are on sale, then used when they are not. This may also require you to change your eating habits just a bit – like eating more whole grain and legume foods that are inexpensive but nutritious. But whatever you choose to store, be sure it’s something you can eat or it will never get rotated.

Rule #3: Whatever you store, insure it is as nutritious as possible with the 50 essential elements required for good health. You should also consider storing a good mineral/vitamin supplement.

Rule #4: Special care should be taken in preserving your emergency supply, especially if you plan on storing it for several years. Generally, if you plan on using it up within a year it should be safe to store your dry grains and beans in the paper or plastic bags it came in. But if you do this, be sure you have a cool, dry place to keep it. Bugs are always a serious concern. If you haven’t bug proofed your food you need to check it every few weeks to insure it stays insect free. Aside from packing up your own dry goods, you can also…

Can your garden produce in bottles. This works best for fresh vegetables and fruits, and even meat if it is done correctly. However, know that after two years, wet packed foods in cans or bottles lose much of their nutritional value. Rotation is the key!

Dehydrate your own foods. Some foods that lend themselves well to this kind of food preservation are potatoes, carrots, onions, peppers, and all kinds of fruits. After dehydration, be sure to store them in air tight bags or containers. It would also be a good idea to throw in a couple of oxygen absorber packets.

Whatever method you use to preserve your food, Store it in a cool, dry, dark place.

Rule 5: Learn to grow a garden now before any hard times come. This way you will get the trial and error out of the way before you really need to eat off your garden. For someone who has never grown

a garden before, it is not as easy as it may seem. There is a real art to growing a great garden and this knowledge doesn’t come all at once. Become proficient at it now, and learn now how to preserve

what you grow. I store 18 months worth of home canned most years

tenzicut – who is starting from scratch

http://pssurvival.com/PS/Food_Storage/Basic_Rules_For_Home_Storage_2004.txt

 

 

HOW MUCH TO STORE?

The experts at the FDA have said that the average adult will consume the following amounts of fresh food per year.

 

Meat – 150 to 200 pounds per year

Flour – 200 to 300 pounds

Sugar or honey – 60 pounds

 Fats or Oils – 60 pounds

Salt – 5 pounds

Powdered Milk – 75 pounds

Vegetables and Fruits – 600 to 700 pounds

Water – 375 gallons

(I would also suggest storing items like vinegar and herbs)

The figures above are nice guidelines, but they need to be considered from the technical angle of preserved foods rather than fresh foods.

 

Meat: Under adverse conditions, people can easily get by with less protein than 150 pounds of fresh meat per year, as that averages to almost a half pound per day! A canned, cooked one pound ham, for example, would be a real treat once a week, and easily feed a family of four. For weekday meals for a family of four, a 5 ounce can of tuna, canned chicken, 12 ounce can of luncheon meat, or 12 ounce can of corned beef can be used in a casserole (or whatever) and provide the required protein.

 Flour: The listed amount of 200 to 300 pounds of flour per year is fairly realistic, as in catastrophic conditions people would be making their own bread and pasta, for example. Using a hand cranked mill to produce flour from whole wheat is a sure way to limit the amount of flour required, as it is hard work!

Sugar or honey: The recommended 60 pounds is the absolute minimum needed, in reality far below the actual amount desired, as sweeteners are the carbohydrates needed for energy, and survival is hard work. The 60 pounds listed by the FDA does not take into account home canning, for example, and people will need to make jellies and jams and can fruits, all of which require a considerable amount of sugar or honey.

Fats or oils: Again, this is an absolute minimum amount needed, as 60 pounds of fats or oils does not go far when used in baking, frying, and other uses. In hard times, people actually require fat in their diet in order to do hard work. In every country in which food is rationed, cooking oils are one of the first items of scarcity. Indeed, in Russia last fall cooking oils were almost impossible to find, even though not specifically rationed. Corn oil stores for years, and so does plain, inexpensive hydrogenated lard.

Salt: Whoever at the FDA dreamed this up must have been a nutrition Nazi. Five pounds of iodized table salt would be the recommended minimum per person per year, but what about making kraut, salt preserving meat, or preserving fish in a barrel of salt? For those needs, a family should have at least 50 pounds of fine grade, non iodized salt, available for less then $5.00 from a feed and seed store. Salt is essential to life! Remember the salt caravans from the old days in Africa and the middle East? Salt was worth more than gold!

Powdered milk: The 75 pounds recommended per person is fine, but for cooking needs a couple of cases (48 cans) of canned, condensed milk is an absolute necessity.

Vegetables and fruits: In hard times, greens and fruits can indeed be a vital food item, as they provide the vitamins and minerals our bodies require to remain healthy. Storing vegetables and fruits is where a food dehydrator really shines. Combine the dried veggies with fresh greens from a garden and canned fruit juices and sauces, and the 600 pound per year amount becomes far more attainable.

http://pssurvival.com/PS/Food_Storage/How_Much_Food_To_Store_2000.PDF

 What to buy on a weekly basis to build up your food storage over the year

 

Week 1 Nuts–get them on sale after Christmas. Drug stores are often a good source. Dry roasted keep best. Freeze bagged ones. 21 lbs. per person  Week 2 Detergents, Bleaches, Cleansers. Bleach 1 gal per person, Laundry soap, 20 lbs per person.  Week 3 Medicine Chest: feminine products, Pepto bismol, cough syrup, Tylenol, Calamine lotion, Kaopectate, Ipecac, sun screen, etc. Dispose of all outdated medications  Week 4 Canned meats: Tuna, Spam, Dried Beef  Week 5 First Aid supplies: Band aids, antibiotic ointment, Ace bandages, steri-strips, etc.  Week 6 Fill your water jugs  Week 7 Peanut butter 10 lbs per person  Week 8 Solid vegetable shortening lbs. per person  Week 9 Juices. Avoid watered products. Get 100% juice.  Week 10 Toothpaste, floss, razors, shaving cream  Week 11 Mixes, cake, pancake, muffin, etc. Purchase or make your own. counts for part of grain requirement. you need an annual total of 300 lbs of grain products per person.  Week 12 Spices and herbs—look for bargains at health food stores or ethnic food stores.  Week 13 Rice buy 10, 15, or 20 pounds. Counts toward grain total  Week 14 More First Aid: gauze patches, swabs. cotton balls, tape, etc.  Week 15 Pasta. Select a variety. Counts toward grain total  Week 16 Dry Milk. 100 lbs per person per year  Week 17 – Assemble emergency sewing kit: thread, pins, needles, buttons, snaps, zippers, tape measure, scissors.  Week 18 – Flour. Consider your families needs. 50 lbs per person? counts toward grain  Week 19 – Dry or canned soup  Week 20 – Gelatin or Pudding mixes  Week 21 – Buy garden seeds locally, if you haven’t mail ordered them. Get only what you will plant and eat. Also consider what you can preserve and eat.  Week 22 – More Flour! 50 lbs per person total.. counts toward grains  Week 23 – Cord, twine or light rope. Flashlights and batteries.  Week 24 – Freeze cheese. Grate and freeze for casseroles or soups.  Week 25 – Paper towels, aluminum foil, garbage bags. freezer bags, etc.  Week 26 – Vinegars: If you make pickles, have several gallons on hand  Week 27 – Condiments: mustard, mayo, relish, Worcestershire  Week 28 – Jams and jellies. Buy what you will not make yourself.  Week 29 – Canned goods. Buy what you eat. veggies: lbs. per person, fruits,: 80 quarts per person  Week 30 – Canned milk Check Dec 1989 Ensign for use Ideas  Week 31 – Back to school supplies and office supplies  Week 32 – Baking powder, soda, cornstarch. Baking soda 2 lbs per person, soda lbs per  Week 33 – Tomatoes juice, sauce, whole or paste. Buy it or make it. part of veggies  Week 34 – Canned Fruit, buy or can 80 quarts per person  Week 35 – More canned fruits and veggies 150 total per person per year  Week 36 – Buy an extra 25 pounds of sugar 100lbs per person total  Week 37 – Can or freeze veggies from garden or fresh purchased, or buy more canned 150 lbs per person per year  Week 38 – Dried beans, peas. 100 lbs per person  Week 39 – Sweeteners. Honey, Molasses, etc. counts toward sugars  Week 40 – Iodized Salt. Ten or more containers. For canning use, get canning salt.  Week 41 – Personal products: soap, deodorant, toilet paper, shampoo, etc. Hand soap, 15 per person, TP: one roll per week  Week 42 – Canned soups: counts toward veggies  Week 43 – Can something with apples.  Week 44 – Hard candy for Halloween. Leftovers will make a good addition to your 72 hour emergency kit.  Week 45 – Vitamins. Get some extra C and Calcium. 365 vitamins per person.  Week 46 – Treats for baking: Cocoa, coconut, nuts, chocolate chips, etc  Week 47 – Rolled oats, corn meal, cream of wheat…Part of grains  Week 48 – Sugars, brown, white, powdered. counts toward 100lbs per person total  Week 49 – Vegetable and olive oils. Get a good quality. 12 lbs. per person  Week 50 – Candles and matches. Put in a cool place and in a sturdy box (preferably fireproof) that you can locate in the dark.  Week 51 – Popcorn. Go for the big bags. Counts toward grains  Week 52 – Merry Christmas. Give yourself a great gift–security for an extended period. 

 

http://pssurvival.com/PS/Food_Storage/What_To_Buy_On_A_Weekly_Basis_For_Food_Storage_2004.txt

 

 

Oathkeepers – How to Use Medicinal Herbs

http://www.yourbodycanheal.com/medicinal-herbs.html

How to Use Medicinal Herbs

So you’ve decided you want to incorporate herbal remedies into your health regimen. Congratulations! You’re embarking on a journey that will help your body heal itself from the inside out in a way that is much more natural, safe and gentle than conventional medicine.

It’s also a journey that can be a little confusing. There are many different types of herbal remedies out there. Sometimes you will find the same herb sold in many different preparations. What do all those different terms mean? Here’s a rundown of some of the most common ways medicinal herbs are sold and used.

Tablets and Capsules: Like conventional drugs, herbs are often packaged and sold in tablet and capsule form. Tablets involve compressing an herb into a round or cylindrical shape, usually with some sort of binder, colorant, flavorings and coating that prevents them from breaking down in the body too quickly. Capsules are usually made of gelatin and the herb is placed inside the shell. Other ingredients can also be mixed in to make the herb taste better or to prevent it from being digested too quickly. Vegetarians can find capsules made of vegetable cellulose, but check the label to make sure you know you’re not getting any animal products.

Extracts: Herbal extracts may be sold as tablets, capsules orliquid herbal extracts; the herbs contained in an extract are far more concentrated than those in a standard pill. Extracts are made by soaking the herbs in alcohol or water (or a combination) and filtering and drying the herb at low heat. Much like culinary herbs become stronger when dried, herbal extracts are highly concentrated remedies, allowing you to take many fewer pills to get a large dose. Continue reading Oathkeepers – How to Use Medicinal Herbs

How To Make Apple Cider Vinegar

We love making our own Apple Cider Vinegar. Check out this article that I found with step by step!!! <3 Kris 

http://thehealthyeatingsite.com/apple-cider-vinegar-recipe/

Making Apple Cider Vinegar From Scraps

Like apple juice, the best apple cider vinegars are organic, unfiltered and raw (unpasteurized). Depending on where you live it may be hard to find really good apple cider vinegar.

Fortunately, it’s easy and very inexpensive to make. It just takes some time, naturally, to ferment. This varies depending on which of the two methods below that you choose to use.

This article will show you how to make apple cider vinegar using two different methods. The first method uses the scraps – cores and apple peels. The second method uses whole apples. 

Method One – Make Apple Cider Vinegar From Scraps

This method uses scraps, like the peels and cores. I like this method because I get to eat my apples and make vinegar too. It’s also faster, taking around two months to complete the process.

You’ll need:
a large bowl or wide-mouth jar
apple scraps, the cores and peels from organic apples
a piece of cheesecloth for covering the jar to keep out flies and debris

Leave the scraps to air. They’ll turn brown, which is exactly what you want. Add the apple scraps to the jar and top it up with water.

You can continue to add scraps for a few more days if you want. If you’re going to do this though, be sure don’t top the jar right up, leave some room for the new scraps.

Cover with the cheesecloth and put it in a warm, dark place. A water cylinder cupboard is perfect.

You’ll notice the contents of the jar starts to thicken after a few days and a grayish scum forms on top. When this happens, stop adding scraps and leave the jar for a month or so to ferment.

After about a month you can start taste-testing it. When it’s just strong enough for you, strain out the apple scraps and bottle the vinegar.

It’s ok if your vinegar is cloudy, there will be some sediment from the apples and what’s known as “the mother”. It’s all good. If you don’t like the cloudiness though, straining it through a paper coffee filter will remove most of the sediment.

Method Two – Make Apple Cider Vinegar From Whole Apples

This method uses whole, organic apples and takes about 7 months to ferment into vinegar.

You’ll need:
10 Whole organically-grown apples
a glass bowl, and later a larger glass bowl
a piece of cheesecloth to cover the bowls

Wash the apples and cut into quarters. You can optionally core and peel them. If you do the scraps can be used to make apple cider vinegar by method one, above.

Let the apples air and turn brown. Then put them into the smaller bowl and cover with water.

Cover the bowl with the cheesecloth and leave in a warm, dark place for 6 months. Again, a hot water cupboard is ideal.

After the 6 months is up, you’ll notice a grayish scum on the surface of the liquid. This is normal. Strain the liquid through a coffee filter into the larger bowl, and leave it for another 4-6 weeks, covered with the cheesecloth.

And there you have it, your own homemade apple cider vinegar

How to use Apple Cider Vinegar

There are lots of ways to use apple cider vinegar. It can be used diluted with water as a hair rinse (don’t worry – the smell disappears quickly), you can also mix with water or fruit juice and drink it.

 

 

Top 23 Uses For Apple Cider Vinegar Backed By Science

by CHANTELLE ZAKARIASEN

Apple Cider Vinegar  has a plethora of useful and medicinal properties. There have been resources written on all the amazing benefits that Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) has regarding multiple physical ailments as well as cleaning and DIY purposes.
ACV is a cheap and effective multi-purpose cleaner, you can add it to your water, tea and salad dressings for a refreshing zing and capitalize on the multiple health benefits you’ll be receiving.

Why All The Fuss Over Apple Cider Vinegar?

The word vinegar translates to vin aigre, is french for “sour wine”. The medicinal uses of vinegar date way back to when it was discovered in 5000 BC by a courtier in Babylonia.

MD’s during the 18th century used it as a multi purpose treatment for ailments like dropsy, stomach ache and even for managing diabetes (1).

Columbus had barrels of apple cider vinegar on his ships to prevent scurvy. Apple cider vinegar was used during the civil war to disinfect wounds and Japanese Samurais drank it for strength and power.

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Hippocrates used vinegar to treat seventeen different conditions (2) ranging from ulcers to fractures.

Apple Cider Vinegar is loaded with vitamins, minerals, and amino acids, its various enzymes help with digestion and 1 Tbs equals is just 3 calories.

 

1. Cleaning 

ACV combined with 2 parts water makes an effective natural disinfectant solution for all surfaces (3).

It’s amazingly affordable compared to commercial natural cleaning products and the smell is really pleasant. You could add a few drops of thieves oil and have a great antibacterial spray for countertops, bathroom, kitchen and carpet deodorizer.

 

2. Hair rinse

There’s a new hair craze on the rise and it relies on the simple method of using baking soda as a shampoo and ACV as a conditioning hair rinse.

Instead of spending loads on junk free shampoos and conditioners, this “no poo” (short for shampoo, not the other stuff) method of hair care works really well and makes your hair super soft.

Thanks to the pH balancing effects that ACV has, anecdotal reports claim it can add shine, softness and break down build up from other hair products.

 

3. Dandruff and Thinning Hair 

The high acidity and powerful enzyme in ACV kill the bacteria responsible for dandruff and hair loss, bottle bacilli, and stimulates our hair natural oils to secrete more effectively and moisturize our scalps better.

Saturate the scalp with ACV and let it sit for a few hours. Use the same treatment for thinning hair and itchy scalp (4).

Continue reading How To Make Apple Cider Vinegar

11 Reasons You Should Go Out Foraging For Juniper Berries

I came across this AWESOME article on Juniper Berries… And I had to share. http://www.naturallivingideas.com/juniper-berries/ 
October 4, 2016 by Sierra Bright

The flavorful berries of junipers are associated with gin, but they have a host of other medicinal and culinary uses. Junipers are conifers, which means they bear cones, rather than berries. So, botanically speaking, juniper berries are not berries, but small female cones with tiny scales that have become fused and fleshy. There are over 50 species of junipers, and all of them bear berries, mostly bluish black with a powdery bloom on them, but some have reddish-orange berries.

You can quickly source dried juniper berries, but they are no match for freshly gathered berries. Look out for accessible juniper trees to get your seasonal supply of berries. Some have needle-like leaves while others have scale leaves that are flush with the stems. Since junipers are mostly dioecious, you need to find female trees and bushes. It’s not hard, though. Since the berries usually take a year or more to mature, the female plants would otherwise have berries at some stage of development throughout the year.

Juniper berries have subtle differences in flavor at different stages of growth. The green berries have a distinctly piney flavor, but they acquire a lemony hint as they mature. The green berries of the common juniper (Juniperus communis) are used for gin flavoring, but many other species such as J. drupacea, J. deppeana, J. oxycedrus and J. California, also produce flavorful berries. Eastern red cedar is also a juniper species (J. virginiana), but its berries are not as pungent as those of J. communis.

Caution: Some species of junipers contain a toxic resin, so it’s IMPORTANT to learn which ones are okay to consume and use. A simple test is biting into a tiny part of a ripe berry. Apart from the flavor, it can be nearly tasteless or mealy, or may be juicy and slightly sweet. If it tastes bitter, spit it out immediately; you don’t want to take a risk with it.

Here are some things you can do with these berries:

1. Use as a digestive aid Juniper berries can improve digestion, just as many other culinary spices do. They increase glandular function, especially the secretion of bile and digestive juices. You can make a tincture or tea from fresh berries or dried ones.

The tea is made by steeping the berries in boiling water for 15-20 minutes. Crush the berries slightly just before adding them to the water. This helps release the bioactive compounds as well as the flavor.

2. Eliminate gas and bloating Stomach pain and discomfort due to gas accumulation is a common complaint, especially after heavy meals. Gas shouldn’t bother you if you have some juniper syrup handy. Have a tablespoon of the syrup after a heavy meal or whenever you feel bloated.

To make the syrup, first, prepare an infusion of juniper berries. Crush 1 oz. berries and add to one cup hot boiled water in a mason jar. Screw the lid on and keep in a warm, dark place for a week, giving the bottle a good shake every day. After a week, mix in 1 cup sugar until it dissolves completely. Strain it into a saucepan and bring to a boil. Pour into a glass jar and store in the refrigerator.

3. Reduce inflammation Juniper berries are anti-inflammatory. It is particularly useful in reducing arthritic pain and swelling. Chronic, generalized inflammation is one of the leading causes of many diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, IBS, etc. Taking a daily dose of 10 drops of juniper tincture once or twice a day may help bring down inflammation and promote good health in general.

To make the tincture, steep crushed juniper berries in alcohol. Try to obtain good quality alcohol, such as Everclear, or use 80-proof vodka or brandy. Use ¾ oz. berries to a cup of alcohol in a glass jar. Keep in a dark place for 4-6 weeks, shaking it once or twice a day. Filter out the clear liquid and store in small bottles.

4. Reduce water retention Water retention in the body makes you feel heavy and lethargic, besides giving you puffy eyes and face. Juniper berries can help reduce water retention by prompting the kidneys to work harder to flush out excess water. This action may also help bring down hypertension. Use a tincture or herbal tea made with juniper berries once or twice a day.

5. Eliminate kidney and gallbladder stones Juniper berries have excellent diuretic action, which helps increase the quantity of urine produced. On the one hand, greater dilution of urine flushes out toxins and mineral salts and prevents the formation of kidney stones. On the other, the extra urine production facilitates the removal of existing stones. Increased bile production and drainage have a similar effect on gall bladder stones.

6. Treat urinary tract infections The antibacterial property of juniper berries combined with the diuretic effect makes it excellent for combating urinary tract infections. The recurring nature of UTI usually make repetitive courses of antibiotics necessary, but this herbal treatment offers an alternative.

7. Relieve congestion Chest congestion due to a cold can be treated with juniper berries. A warm tea made from fresh green berries or 5-10 drops of a tincture in a glass of warm water can be used at bedtime to relieve congestion. It is good for asthmatics also. If you want to avoid alcohol use in children, the juniper berries can be infused in high-quality glycerin.

8. Use as antiseptic Juniper berry tincture can be used as an antiseptic solution to prevent infections setting in cuts and wounds. Wash the wound with diluted tincture or dab it on. It can be used as an antiseptic face wash to reduce acne inflammation and prevent infections too.

9. Flavor meat dishes Juniper berries impart a peppery taste and flavor to dishes, which goes very well with meat preparations. In fact, dried berries were commonly used in place of black pepper when the latter was very expensive. Ripe berries are used in cooking and flavoring because they don’t have much of the turpentine-like taste of the green berries.

10. Use in pickles and soups The peppery flavor of juniper berries goes very well with pickled vegetables and soups. It is, in fact, a popular ingredient of sauerkraut. You can either use fresh berries or dried ones, but crushing them with a pestle or mortar helps release the flavors. Since dry berries have a milder flavor, you need to use more.

11. Make a refreshing drink A fermented Bosnian drink called Smerka can be made from juniper berries and plain water. Add 1 cup berries to 2 quarts of water and allow to ferment for a week or more. The drink is ready when all the berries sink to the bottom. Strain the liquid and drink it lightly sweetened with raw honey if you like.

Bonus: Of course juniper berries are most famous for making gin. Check out this recipe over at Seriouseats.com to find out how to do that.

Caution: Juniper berries should be used in moderation since the active compounds in them stimulate the kidneys. They should be avoided during pregnancy as they may cause strong uterine contractions.