Solar Oven (or crockpot) Steak and Chop Pork Chops and Build Your Own Solar Oven

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This is one of the simplest recipes in the solar oven….

Pork Chops with a Steak and Chop sauce –

Place 2-4 pork chops per bucket and pour steak and chop sauce over them.

Place inside your solar oven and seal the lid. Place the solar oven in a sunny location pointing towards the sun. (You may need to turn your oven throughout the day.) Leave inside your oven for 6+ hours or until the meat is done.

Rowan is sealing the ovens to cook the pork chops.

Want to build your own solar oven? https://www.popsci.com/build-diy-solar-oven/ has a great article that I included below:

DIY Solar Oven
It’s simple, and it won’t drive up your utilities bills: this DIY solar oven can cook a hot meal on its own.Brian Klutch

You don’t need a gas stove to cook a hot meal while you’re out exploring. Lightweight flat-pack materials like cardboard can assemble into an oven that harnesses sunlight for heat. This solar oven, designed by high school student Brandon Spellman, can reach temperatures above 200°F.

Stats

  • Time: 2 hours
  • Cost: $30
  • Difficulty: Easy

Tools & Materials

  • Two cardboard boxes
  • Box cutter
  • Silicone adhesive
  • 1-inch-thick foam insulation
  • Black gaffer tape
  • Scissors
  • Eight 1-foot bamboo skewers
  • Aluminum tape
  • Sheets of glass or plastic
  • Oven mitts

Instructions

  1. Line the inside of one box with adhesive and foam insulation, and cover the insulation with gaffer tape.
  2. Cut duplicates of the first box’s flaps from the second box. Tape the duplicates to the outer edges of the originals, doubling their surface area.
  3. Poke two skewers into each side of the box to prop open the flaps. Adjust their angles for maximum sunlight, using this handy guide.
  4. Cut cardboard triangles to fit in the gaps between the flaps and affix them with gaffer tape. Cover the flaps with aluminum tape.
  5. To cook, lay the glass on the insulation and position the oven to catch the sunlight. It gets hot, so handle with oven mitts when it’s cooking.

This article was originally published in the January/February 2017 issue of Popular Science, under the title “The Sun Stove.”


For just as through the disobedience of the one man the many were made sinners, so also through the obedience of the one man the many will be made righteous.


This blog post is shared on You're the Star Blog Hop, Friendship Friday, Simple Homestead Blog Hop, Homestead Blog Hop, Tuesdays with a Twist, Wonderful Wednesday
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