Elderberry Syrup for those winter colds

My children know that when they are starting to feel yucky, they can just go into the fridge and get out the elderberry syrup. And all they need to do is to take a spoonful. We have been making this for years. 

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup dried elderberries (There are many places to get these… The best price that I have found and from a company that I trust is Mountain Herbs – https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/elder-berries/profile
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 cinnamon stick (I keep these around for my chai tea)
  • 4 whole cloves (I keep these around for my chai tea, too)
  • 1 cup honey (I buy local honey from a small store in my area called HoneyMan.)

Instructions

  1. Add the berries, water, cloves, ginger, and cinnamon stick to a large pot and bring to a boil. 
  2. Once boiling, reduce the berry mixture to a simmer. (I actually cooked today’s batch on my wood stove)
  3. Allow ingredients to simmer for 30 minutes.
  4. After 30 minutes, remove from the heat.
  5. Add your honey to your jar.
  6. Strain the berries from the juice, using a cheesecloth and small mesh sieve over your jar. 
  7. Now you have the perfect syrup for fighting off the sniffles this season. Keep your jar in the fridge.
  8. Take 1 tablespoon daily by spoon . When I am in the middle of a cold, I take it 3 times a day. 

Age Appropriate Chore Chart – FREE PDF Download

Living with a larger family full of kids and critters and homeschooling the whole crew, a house can get in disarray and fast.

Here is an age-appropriate chore chart to help get you back on task. We recently re-implemented this with even our older kids as a reminder of what we can all work on together. (We did not add any pet or farm responsibilities here.

Here is a FREE Download:  KrisandLarry - Age Appropriate Chores for Kids (7 downloads)

Colloidal Silver – What is it?

After 2 weeks of coughing and tight lungs, I finally went in to see the doctor. Dr. Chris took one look at me and said Walking Pneumonia…. ewww Every year at the same time, I get severe allergies and then cough an wheeze for months.  Fast forward to 11/7/2018 (now 5-1/2 weeks with a cough and mucus) It is time to hit the books and break down and purchase some colloidal silver. Many of my family and friends had suggested it. 24 hours after, I stopped taking my chest congestion medication. And my mucus is finally moving!

What I can tell you is that I feel ridiculous that I didn’t try this sooner and have been coughing for almost 6 weeks. After 4 days, I am still slightly coughing, but do feel 100% better. 

There is no flavor…. and no you are not drinking something that looks like molten mercury.  (I have to admit that was one of MY questions too!)

I am using a spray bottle and I give 2 or 3 good sprays 4 times a day.  

It is a 4oz bottle of WATER with 10ppm (10 parts per million of micro silver suspended in distilled water. )

Colloidal silver has been used for centuries to promote good health and studies continue to also show that colloidal silver outperforms many mainstream methods used against harmful organisms. With so many cases of antibiotic resistance, it’s no wonder why colloidal silver has become extremely popular in recent years. Consumers should know, however, that not all silver products are created equal. Here are 5 things you must know about colloidal silver.

https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/5-things-must-know-colloidal-silver/

5 Things About Colloidal Silver
1. Parts Per Million (PPM) is Mildly Important
When it comes to colloidal silver, don’t get caught up in how many parts per million — or PPM — a solution has. Although it’s not a mundane detail, what’s really important is the particle size. Smaller particles can move more easily throughout your body and they’re more bioavailable. Particle sizes less than .005 microns are ideal. Sometimes this is indicated on the label, sometimes not. One way to tell if silver particles are too large is by examining the color of the solution. A dark or murky-color usually indicates large silver particles and other impurities.

2. Silver Won’t Upset Beneficial Intestinal Organisms
A lot of people use silver as defense against harmful organisms. Unlike antibiotics which wipeout both the “bad” and the “good” organisms present in the intestinal tract, silver maintains a balance of intestinal microorganisms. Silver absorbs quickly in the upper GI tract, and little gets through to cause problems for the beneficial bacteria in the small intestine and colon.

3. Good Colloidal Silver Won’t Turn You Blue
Occasionally you may hear of an individual who develops argyria, a condition that develops when silver proteins cause a blueing of the skin. (Do a Google search for Paul Karason.) While this may happen when people use ultra low quality silver solutions, pure hydrosol colloidal silver without additives, proteins, or salts does not cause this condition. This is why it’s imperative to obtain the purest solution available.

4. Purity Matters
Colloidal silver isn’t just a mixture of silver and water; it’s a solution where the silver particles are suspended in water and have an electrical charge. This type of solution requires ultra pure water. It also requires special equipment necessary to create and maintain a constant charge. Many colloidal silver home brew kits use salts or other compounds during the process to suspend the silver in the solution. Products like this do not offer the same effect as colloidal silver produced with high voltage technology.

5. Only Use the Best Colloidal Silver
Not all colloidal silver products are created alike. First and foremost, choose a product that’s been produced using high voltage alternating current technology. This production method requires specialized equipment and produces a silver solution of unparalleled quality and purity compared to low-tech low voltage methods

The following is a GREAT article to help understand more about Colloidal Silver and its uses. https://wholelifestylenutrition.com/natural-solutions/uses-and-benefits-for-colloidal-silver/

USES AND BENEFITS FOR COLLOIDAL SILVER AND HOW IT CAN HELP YOU!
WHAT IS COLLOIDAL SILVER?
Colloidal silver is a mineral that can be beneficial for the body in many different ways.It is a solution of water containing nanometre-sized particles of suspended silver.(3)

It has antibacterial, antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, helps heal wounds and cuts, and helps treat eczema, rosacea, and psoriasis. 

USES AND BENEFITS FOR COLLOIDAL SILVER

USES FOR COLLOIDAL SILVER

There are many uses and benefits for colloidal silver.  Here are just a few from Web.MD:

Colloidal silver is used to treat infections due to yeast; bacteria (tuberculosis, Lyme disease, bubonic plague, pneumonia, leprosy, gonorrhea, syphilis, scarlet fever, stomach ulcers, cholera); parasites (ringworm, malaria); and viruses (HIV/AIDS, pneumonia, herpes, shingles, warts).

Colloidal silver is also used for lung conditions including emphysema and bronchitis; skin conditions including rosacea, cradle cap (atopic dermatitis), eczema, impetigo, and psoriasis; and inflammation (sometimes due to infection) of the bladder (cystitis), prostate (prostatitis), colon (colitis), nose (rhinitis), stomach (gastritis), tonsils (tonsillitis), appendix (appendicitis), and sinuses (sinusitis).

Other uses include treatment of cancer, diabetes, arthritis, lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome, leukemia, hay fever and other allergies, trench foot, and gum disease.

Colloidal silver is also used to prevent flu, H1N1 (swine) flu, and the common cold.

Some women take colloidal silver during pregnancy to aid the baby’s growth and health as well as the mother’s delivery and recovery.

Colloidal silver is applied directly to the skin for acne, burns, eye infections, fungal infections, throat infections, skin infections, and Staphylococcus infections. ~ Web MD

It should go without mentioning that you should always talk to your healthcare provider before trying this or any supplement.

BENEFITS OF COLLOIDAL SILVER

There are so many uses and benefits for colloidal silver, and better yet — there are also proven benefits too!

Here are 8 proven colloidal silver benefits from our friends over at Dr. Axe.

Discovering Education – Field Trip – Bearizona, Williams, Arizona

****Note: It is a RIVER OTTER, not a SEA OTTER in the video****

What a fantastic time we as a family had up in Williams, AZ visiting Bearizona for their fall homeschool day.  Bearizona is an amazing zoo type park in Northern Arizona. It is on 160 acres and comes in 2 parts. The first is a 3-mile drive through where you can see many animals in a more natural environment. The second part is a zoo where you can walk through. 

Check out our adventure in video and photos below.  This park gets a 2 thumbs up from our homeschooling family! And we plan on going again!

 

 

 

Thank you Veterans!

Thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

We are free because of the brave! 

To all those to have, are and will serve in our military, Happy Veteran’s Day from our family
to you and yours. 

Recipe – Cheesy Beef Noodles

This is a recipe that I found a long time ago and had jotted down on a post-it note. We have been making this for about a year now and have altered it to fit our family. 🙂

INGREDIENTS:

  • 16 ounces medium pasta shells
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1-1/2 pounds ground beef
  • 1 medium sweet onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1Tablespoon Italian seasoning, dried basil or oregano
  • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3 cups beef stock
  • 1 can of diced tomatoes
  • 1 can of roasted green chilies
  • 1-1/2 cup heavy cream
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 12 ounces shredded extra-sharp cheddar cheese, about 3 cups

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook pasta according to package instructions; drain well and set aside
  2. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add ground beef and cook into small crumbles until browned. Set aside.
  3. Add onion, and cook, stirring frequently, until translucent, about 2-3 minutes. Stir in garlic and seasoning until fragrant. 
  4. Whisk in flour until lightly browned, about 1 minute.
  5. Stir in chilies and diced tomatoes.
  6. Gradually whisk in beef stock. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until reduced and slightly thickened, about 6-8 minutes.
  7. Stir in pasta, beef, and heavy cream until heated through, about 1-2 minutes; season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  8. Stir in cheese until melted.
  9. Serve immediately.
 
 

Himalayan Salt Lamp

I have been doing a lot of research on the Himalayan salt lamp and all of the benefits that it has.

(This is psuedo-science and many western medicine doctors don’t believe that they are any more than a pretty light. But many eastern medicine and natural paths believe otherwise. )

However, after looking into more “natural” medicines in my home, I have found that there are possibilities that this lamp can help with negative ions in the air and help pull out allergins.  And I get a pretty light too. 😉

 After my partial thyroidectomy 5 years ago (WOW! It has been that long!!) the doctor took me off of iodized table salt and put me only on blue/grey Celtic salt or pink Himalayan salt at home. It is hard to avoid when you go out to eat.  That is where my research started. When a regular ENT tells you to do something “natural” and not something from a pharmacy, you listen.

So this post is 5 years in the making. 🙂

Yes, there are skeptics, and I totally get it! But wouldn’t you rather try something that could help than turn your head?

Regular table salt is primarily just sodium chloride. Himalayan salt is still about 98% sodium chloride, but also contains trace minerals (over 80)  like magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Trace minerals give Himalayan salt its beautiful pink and orange coloring. 

Here is a list of the minerals that are found in Himalayan Salt from the LiveStrong website – The Meadow lists elements found in Himalayan salt in addition to sodium and chloride. In alphabetical order, they are: actinium, aluminum, antimony, arsenic, astatine, barium, beryllium, bismuth, boron, bromine, cadmium, calcium, carbon, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, fluorine, francium, gadolinium, gallium, germanium, gold, hafnium, holmium, hydrogen, indium, iodine, iridium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, neodymium, neptunium, nickel, niobium, nitrogen, osmium, oxygen, palladium, phosphorus, platinum, plutonium, polonium, potassium, praseodymium, protactinium, radium, rhenium, rhodium, rubidium, ruthenium, samarium, scandium, selenium, silicon, silver, sodium, strontium, sulfur, tantalum, tellurium, terbium, thallium, thorium, thulium, tin, titanium, uranium, vanadium, wolfram, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc and zirconium.

According to the  Global Healing Center

Himalayan Crystal Salt: The Health Benefits

Himalayan crystal salt has matured over the past 250 million years under intense tectonic pressure in an environment that’s free of toxins and impurities.[1] Even better, this form of salt contains about 80 natural minerals and elements used by the human body.[2] It’s popular in Ayurvedic, Tibetan, and other traditions. Adherents believe that Himalayan salt’s unique cellular structure allows it to store vibrational energy. Many also believe that natural Himalayan crystal salt offers health benefits such as:[34]

  • Regulating water levels in the body
  • Promoting stable pH balance
  • Encouraging healthy blood sugar levels
  • Reducing the appearance of aging
  • Promoting cellular hydroelectric energy balance
  • Aiding vascular health
  • Supporting healthy respiratory function
  • Promoting overall sinus health
  • Reducing cramps
  • Promoting healthy sleep patterns
  • Encouraging healthy libido
  • Promoting kidney and gallbladder health

So let’s talk more about the lamp! 

Salt is naturally hygroscopic.  Hygroscopy is the ability of a substance to attract and hold water molecules from the surrounding environment. So, the salt lamps can potentially attract water molecules in the air. Since water in the air can also hold allergens, pollutants, and even bacteria, these substances get attracted to the lamp too. The heated salt lamp supposedly dries out the water vapor, leaving the particles attached to the salt. Anything that helps get allergens out of the air of my office is a plus in my eyes since I spend so much time in there on the computer. Many sources recommend wiping down the salt lamp with a cloth at least once a week to clean it off.

The lamp can produce negative ions (not a lot). The negative ions cling to the positive ions that items like electronics produce and help eliminate some of those “disturbances in the force”. (Yes, a Star Wars reference just came out.) So, I opted to put my lamp in my office by my computer for that reason as well. 

There is research done on the colors of the lights that we use… At night, blue lights are bad for the brain and can interrupt sleep cycles… The salt lamp with their pink/orange hues can help with better sleeping even when used as a night light. 

My plan is to pick up one for each of my kid’s rooms to add a beautiful light and to possibly help better their health and the air quality even if it is just slightly. 🙂

 

 

Have you met a Muscovy Duck?

Have you met a Muscovy Duck?

Muscovies are not related to any other duck, in fact, some believe they are possibly descended from geese rather than ducks. They are amazing additions to any homestead or farm. 

Muscovies are a silent duck (Yes, you read that, they.do.not.quack) and they have amazing caruncles on their face and necks. They also have long claws and will roost in trees if they want, unlike other ducks that I have raised over the years. 

Muscovy Eggs

Ducks eggs are the richest, creamiest, smoothest eggs going. We use duck eggs in our baking and it tends to make cakes rise more and be fluffier. Muscovies, however, are not year-round layers, so if you are looking for year-round duck eggs, this is not necessarily the breed for you. 

Muscovy Ducks Used for Meat

Muscovy meat is dark and very lean. It’s worth knowing that the boys weigh in much heavier than the girls and can be up to twice their weights. 

Feeding you Ducks

In the summer months our birds will require very little extra food as they forage plenty even on our little homestead in Northern Arizona, but in the colder months they’ll need feeding a duck or  chicken feed daily. My do like to forrage through the Kune Pigs’ Alfalfa feeder in the winter time as well. 

 

Firestarters to make it easier in the winter

Here is a download of this oathkeeper class if you want it as a printout:  oathkeepers-firestarters-Feb2017.pdf (30 downloads)

Learning different techniques to get that heat and/or cooking first started can be a matter of life and death. Here are a few tricks for fire-starters to get you started on some survival knowledge. These work great too in your own fireplace, wood stove, manual pellet stoves or your outdoor fire pit. (We use a few of these at our house too!) Many are great to keep in your camping and 72 hour bags as well.

We also get a chance to show you a simple and effective room heater to use ONLY in an emergency (we have heated up our greenhouse in the dead of winter with it until we got a Chiminea to help with the colder northern Arizona winters.)

What firestarters do our family use? Right now, the toilet paper roll stuffed with lint is our go to. We use this one even without the wax on it. 

Having reliable DIY fire starters nearby will spare you from many headaches down the road.

 Posted by Ryan Lisson – January 9, 2015  

http://www.wideopenspaces.com/make-easy-diy-fire-starters-home-woods/

It doesn’t matter if you’re in the great outdoors, your fenced-in backyard, or sitting next to your cozy living room fireplace, a quality DIY fire starter is just nice to have. As a rule of thumb, you should know how to start a fire without one. (You do, don’t you?) If not, you should learn soon as it’s just ahead of tying knots when it comes to necessary outdoor skills.

But there are situations when you’re short on time, or the kindling is a little damp, or you just plain want an easy way out (no judgment here). Or perhaps you don’t get outdoors much and don’t want to embarrass yourself by committing all kinds of camping blunders.

Worry no more. These DIY fire starters are simple to construct, cheap to make, and will save you time and frustration in the long run. Plus, they make great gifts as well!

Materials

First, you’ll need to collect some materials. Luckily, nearly every item needed for these DIY fire starters is easily found within or around your home. Odd leftover bits of candle wax, crayon stubs, paraffin wax, shredded paper, toilet paper/paper towel tubes, dryer lint, paper/fiber egg cartons, small paper cups, sawdust, pine cones, and string are some solid choices, but feel free to experiment! You’ll need an old coffee can or glass jar to melt the waxes, and do so by placing in a pot of boiling water (double boiler system).

Pine Cones

Simply gather up as many open pine cones in your yard as you can and allow them to dry well. Tie a string around the middle and thread it up to the top. Melt paraffin wax with some chunks of old crayons or candles (for color) and dip the pine cone into the hot wax. Allow to dry on wax paper. When ready, simply light the string like a wick, and watch the pine cone go!

Woodchip Cups

If you do any woodwork or cut your own firewood, you’ll likely have large amounts of sawdust, shavings, or chips laying around. Gather some up and let it dry out well. Fill some paper cups (or muffin cups in a muffin tin) with the shavings almost to the top. Pour the wax over the mixture and let harden.

Shredded Paper

You can follow the same recipe as the wood chip fire starter above. Just gather up some shredded paper (most homes and offices have plenty of this available) and fill the muffin cups as before. Pour wax over it and let harden. Then light the shreds of paper or the muffin cup itself to start it.

Toilet Paper Tube

Obviously you could cut up a paper towel roll as well for this fire starter idea, but simply stuff dryer lint or other flammable materials into the tube. Make sure it’s full but not packed, as you need air space to let oxygen in. You can add wax or petroleum jelly as well, but it works quite well as is.

Cardboard Strips

We all have too much corrugated cardboard coming through our house. Instead of recycling or burning it, do both! Cut strips about two inches wide by three or four inches long. Dip them in melted wax, leaving a small portion undipped. The corrugation leaves channels for air flow, and these light very easily.

Other ideas?

Don’t limit yourself to just these examples. There are many other creative ways to make your own DIY fire starter. You could use birch bark, dried conifer twigs, cotton balls, etc. Or you could even combine some of these ideas together, such as putting a pinecone into an egg shell container, and covering with wax and sawdust.

As long as it lights easily and burns for a few minutes, you’ve succeeded.

 

 

 

 

 

The Uber Match- http://www.practicalprimitive.com/skillofthemonth/ubermatch.html  (additional photo

(As featured in the September 2011 issue of Practically Seeking)

 

The ability to get a fire going can be the difference between life and death. That is why I always have multiple means of creating one at my disposal.

The Uber Match is simple to make, and when done correctly is reliable, along with being highly water and wind  resistant. Why you would NOT have a couple of these in ANY outdoor kit I cannot fathom!

Though traditionally made using strike anywhere matches (yes, you can still find them in this post 9-11 world) they can also be made using strike-on-the-box varieties — just make sure you have the box striker as well or you are screwed.
An Uber Match will burn for 5-7 minutes easily, produces a much larger flame than a standard match and gives off far more heat.

A major trick to making sure your Uber Matches will really work well is to allow a little bit of space between the matches and just below the match head.

Now onward with the process!

Step-by-step Instructions on How to Make an Uber Match:

  1. Take out 4 matches, preferably of the strike-anywhere variety. (These are the ones that have a white tip on the red match-head.)

 

  1. Completely unroll a regular cotton ball, and then split it in half, length-wise. (One cotton ball makes two Uber Matches.)

 

  1. Melt paraffin wax (our preferred wax for this and available at your grocery or hardware store) or any other type of wax (old candles, crayons, beeswax, etc) in a small container over low heat. An old tuna can works great for this and will sit easily on the stove burner.

 

  1. While your wax is melting, take one of your matches and, starting just below the tip (make sure you can see a short bit of the match stick) wrap around the stick one complete turn with the cotton. Take your second match place it up against the first, then wrap the cotton once completely around the two together.

  

  1. Add your third and then fourth matches in the same manner, wrapping the cotton around all three, then all four matches, creating a square, not a line. This way of wrapping creates necessary air space between the matches to allow for easy ignition. (Remember fire requires fuel, heat and oxygen to establish combustion.)

   

  1. After all 4 matches have been wrapped together continue to wrap the remaining cotton around all 4 sticks until you have completely covered the match sticks all the way down to the bottom. Strive to make the wrap nice and even all the way down, as if you were wrapping a mummy for Halloween.

  

  1. Roll the now completely wrapped matches tightly between your fingers to really squeeze down the cotton wrapping.

 

  1. Give the BASE of your Uber Match a quick dip in the melted wax and allow to cool and harden slightly. (For the sake of domestic relations, lay down a piece of aluminum foil for a cooling station — wax can be very difficult to remove from counters, stove tops and plates!)

  

  1. Once the base is cool enough to handle, give the top of your matches a quick dip in the wax far enough that the entire Uber Match is now completely coated in wax. Set it aside and allow to cool. When the wax is cool enough to handle but still warm enough to mold, use your fingers to press the wax-covered cotton into the matches and shape each Uber Match to a nice smooth cylinder.

  

  1. After the wax has hardened on all your Uber Matches, place several into an old pill bottle (along with the box striker if you have been forced to use strike-on-box types) and put this in with your camping gear/emergency kit/GO Bag. Allow the remaining wax to cool in the tuna can and it will be ready to melt again for your next set of matches!

  

  1. These Uber Matches will strike even when wet. And be careful, they have a much bigger flame than a regular match!

  

 

 

 

 

How Do I Make Vaseline Cotton Ball Fire Starters?

http://www.ramblinjim.com/articles/using-vaseline-cotton-balls-as-a-fire-starter/

To make your fire starters, you just need two ingredients — petroleum jelly and cotton balls. Any brand of petroleum jelly will work, just make sure it’s 100% pure petroleum jelly. You’ll need a lot of it, so get it in bulk. For the cotton balls, get jumbo-sized cotton balls and check the package to be sure they’re 100% cotton. Artificial fibers won’t take a spark.

Rubbing the Vaseline into a cotton ball is messy work. The fibers of the cotton ball tend to pull apart and the Vaseline gets everywhere. The cleanest, easiest method I’ve found is to put a scoop of Vaseline into a snack-sized Ziploc bag, toss some cotton balls in, zip it up, then knead the Vaseline into the cotton balls.

You want to get as much Vaseline in the cotton ball as you can without completely saturating the cotton ball. It’s very important to have some dry fibers available in the middle to take the flame, especially if you use a firesteel or magnesium rod.

 

How to Make Lint Fire Starters

https://www.thebalance.com/how-to-make-lint-fire-starters-1388857

 By Erin Huffstetler  Updated July 05, 2016

Forget about paying for fire starters. You can make all the fire starters you need for free.

Difficulty: Easy

Time Required: 15 minutes or less

What You Need

  • Dryer lint
  • Cardboard egg cartons
  • candle wax (old candles work great)

Here’s How

  1. Fill each cup of the egg carton with dryer lint.
  2. Melt the wax in a double boiler.
  3. Pour the wax over top of the lint.
  4. Allow the wax to cool and harden. Then, cut the egg carton up to create 12 fire starters.

To use: Simply place a fire starter in your fireplace (or firepit) with your kindling and light. The wax will keep the starter going long enough to ignite your kindling.

Tips

  1. Be sure to cover your work surface, before you start.
  2. You can use saw dust from non-pressure-treated wood in place of the dryer lint, or broken crayons in place of the candle wax. There’s plenty of room to improvise.
  3. Fire starters make great gifts. Make a bunch, and you’ll be all set for Christmas.

 

 

Tea Light Personal Space Heater

http://simplydixon.com/2014/01/06/tea-light-heater/

Jeremy January 6, 2014 do it yourselfhome

This may sound like one of those “free” energy things, and I’ll admit that I was a bit skeptical about this working until this morning. After spending a morning next to this thing, I can now say that this tea light candle heater actually works. You have to be near it to get warmer or have a small space to heat, but it works…really.

What is it?

Basically it is 4 tea light candles, placed in a foil lined bread dish, covered up with one terracotta pot and that covered up with a larger terracotta pot.

How well does it work?

I have a relatively large space in my completely unheated basement office, but if i put it next to where i’m sitting I can definitely feel the heat.

Why it works

The inner pot gets really warm, even hot to the touch, so I imagine that the two pot system helps keep some of the heat contained so it can slowly let it radiate from the pot instead of letting the candles heat dissipate quickly in the cold air. I’m sure there are many others who know a lot more about the inner workings of this type of a heating method.

How I made mine

  • 1 glass bread dish (metal would probably work better if we had one)
  • Line the dish with aluminum foil (I figure it would help reflect the heat back at the pots)
  • 4 tea light candles placed in the center of the dish (you can get100 of them from amazon for $8.95)
  • one smaller clay pot, set on the dish (must be large enough to rest on the top of the dish to create airflow for the candles)
  • a larger clay pot set on top of the whole thing but resting on the top of the bread dish.